secrets-of-the-trevi-fountainAs you’re walking through the crowded, stuffy streets of Rome you can’t help but be sucked into the Trevi vortex. A whirl of people are all unknowingly dragged towards what is essentially the centre of Rome; The Trevi Fountain. Frankly, you smell it and hear it before you see it. The warm and slightly comforting smell of chlorine mixed with the rush of water is a que to get get excited and finally, as you turn the corner, there it is! The shocking blue contrasts with the virginal white marble perfectly.

Most people rock up, take pictures, cross it off their Roman bucket list and move on. If only they’d stay for a moment or two longer, maybe they would see the little secrets of the Trevi fountain lurking amongst the marble.

panorama-of-the-trevi-fountain

I – The fountain dates back to ancient Roman empire, since the construction of the Aqua Virgo Aqueduct in 19 B.C. which provided water to the Roman baths and the fountains of central Rome. It’s said that the Aqua Virgo, or Virgin Waters, is named in after of a young Roman girl who led thirsty soldiers to the source of a spring to drink. Check out the small frescos to see the story re-told.

story-of-the-trevi-fountain

II – It is said that if you drink from the virginal waters you virginity will be restored -but who wants to go through that again? Make sure you hunt out the little water fountain to the side for an opportunity to reactivate your virginity.

virginal water at the trevi fountain.JPG

III – The Trevi Fountain’s construction began in 1730 for 32 years. Water finally came out of the fountain for the people in 1743,  The Fountain was completed in 1762.

IV – The fountain was built at the end point of the aqueduct, at the junction of three roads. These three streets (tre-vie) give the Trevi Fountain its name, the Three Street Fountain.

V – The Trevi Fountain stands a massive 85 feet tall and is almost 65 feet wide and is easily considered one of the most beautiful baroque fountains in the world.

bright-photo-of-the-trevi-fountain

VI – The fountain spills about 2,824,800 cubic feet of water every day! No need to fret though, today the water is recycled.

VII – The legend holds that a coin thrown into the fountain will ensure a return to Rome. This tradition also dates back to the ancient Romans who often threw coins in water to make the gods of water favour their journey or help them get back home safely. (Throw in a second coin if you’re seeking love – even a third for wedding bells!)

Everyday roughly €3,000 splooshes into the Trevi waters, but what many don’t know is that the coins are collected every night and given to an Italian charity called Caritas. They in turn use it on a supermarket program giving rechargeable cards to Rome’s needy to help them get groceries.

VIII – If you look *really* carefully to the top right of the surrounding windows, note there that there is a window imposter; what a pane (soz!). Stories say that there was a lady who jumped to her death from the window and her ghost stuck around freaking out passes by. So in a beautiful act of kindness, they bricked up the window and painted on a false window!

painted-fake-window-of-the-trevi-fountain

IX – See the strange looking urn on the right hand side? Yep, that’s another strange secret of the Trevi Fountain. several years ago, shop owners had to pay for the upkeep of the fountain, however one barber refused so a urn was built to block his and his patrons view of the fountain.

urn next to the trevi fountain.JPG

So there you have it, 9 cute little secrets of the Trevi Fountain. Rome is a huge city and also easily stroll-able but incase you need some tips, check out my MEGA Rome guide

colourful trevi fountain .png

 

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